The definition of power

Machine language is powerful. The programmer has absolute control over the machine. Anything that a computer is physically capable of doing, it can be made to do.

Machine language is not powerful. Even simple conceptual operations take many instructions to code. You’re forced to work in the machine’s terms and manually control all the devices, memory and cpu registers.

SQL is powerful. Its possible to write highly complex queries that tell the machine what information you want it to return to you without any knowledge of how it will go about finding it.

SQL is not powerful. It is not possible to tell the machine how do achieve something, only to ask it for information and hope it goes about the task in an effective way.

Java & .NET are powerful. The environment takes care of interacting with the devices, memory and cpu registers. Its easy to model human concepts on these platforms.

Java and .NET are not powerful. If low-level functionality is needed that was considered too dangerous by the system designers, there is no way to access it from within the environment.

Smalltalk is powerful. The environment takes care of interacting with the devices, memory and cpu registers. Its easy to model human concepts on this platform.

Smalltalk is powerful. Low level functionality is implemented in the same language as high level concepts. If access is needed, the code is accessible from within the environment. The virtual machine can be extended by adding custom primitives.

Smalltalk is powerful.

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